The Voice of Vulnerability

Updated: Dec 2, 2019

My main purpose for starting Karlene Millwood International (KMI) was to help vulnerable women find their voice by cultivating and bolstering their sense of self-worth, significance and value and guide them to becoming the leaders that they were born to be. Today I take a step back to reflect on that mandate especially in the wake of the death of little Raya Rajkumar at the hands of her father in February 2019. Prior to this tragedy, the Canadian population was shocked to learn about the death of Dr. Elana Shamji at the hands of her husband, Neurosurgeon, Dr. Mohamed Shamji in November 2016.


A Global News report in January 2019 states that, for the past four years, a woman or girl is killed every two and a half days in Canada. On the heels of the #metoo movement, pundits are bringing awareness to these heart-breaking occurrences with the hashtag, #callitfemicide.


Abuse exists and is perpetrated in many forms leaving large percentages of men and women feeling vulnerable in some way. The most well-known forms of abuse are:

  • Physical

  • Sexual

  • Verbal/emotional

  • Mental/Psychological

  • Financial/Economic

  • Cultural/Identity

Experts have recently added affluent abuse to this list. In the past when I mentioned that my niche or target market was vulnerable men and women, many people instantly assumed that it meant working with the urban population, or those living in low socio-economic conditions. However, the term affluent abuse puts that to rest immediately showing that vulnerability exists across the gamut of social and economic statuses.


Isn’t it time we took the blinders off and release our personal and societal biases and see that many successful people are among the most vulnerable in our society? Social status does not stem the effects of abuse that leaves an individual with feelings of unworthiness from being belittled, manipulated or controlled.


It’s this prevailing mindset that often causes these forms of abuse to go unreported. Who’s going to believe an affluent or upscale man or woman who says their spouse is abusing them? The fears of reporting instances of abuse are real for both lower and upper-class victims. How will it affect the children? This is usually the biggest of the fears, and while some victims will try to tough it out for the children’s sake, there is a danger to doing so.


Remember that the family unit is the blueprint for your children’s relationships going forward. They practice what they see at home. We should empower them to love themselves and abhor negative or abusive attitudes, not how to become abusers or to endure being victims of abuse.


We reproduce who we are therefore it’s important to ensure that, as adults, we’re empowered mentally, emotionally and psychologically to deal with life’s ups and downs. Live in a way that instills self-love as a basic foundation in our children. Empower yourself to create an empowered generation of leaders and thinkers. It begins with the individual. It requires letting go of old paradigms and shifting into a more elevated level of thinking rooted in the divine agape love of the eternal God from whom truth and goodness flows.


If you or someone you know is in an abusive situation, I encourage you to seek help immediately. Say something! Find someone you trust and confide in them and devise a way to remove yourself or the individual from that environment. Call the Crisis Prevention Hotline, the police, a friend or family member who will give you the support that you need.


We’re also here to help. At KMI we work with vulnerable women and men to help you (re)gain your confidence by reintroducing you to the true essence of who you are. We guide you into shifting your mindset to see your worth and value as powerful and significant individuals. We empower you to overcome adversity and live authentically and purposefully every day.


It’s time to break the silence and take back your power. It’s time to be the TRUE YOU!

©2020 by Karlene Millwood International